<ArticleSet>
<Article>
<Journal>
<PublisherName>Shiraz University of Medical Sciences</PublisherName>
<JournalTitle>Journal of Research on History of Medicine</JournalTitle>
<Issn>2251-886X</Issn>
<Volume>1</Volume>
<Issue>2</Issue>
<PubDate>
<Year>2012</Year>
<Month>05</Month>
<Day>01</Day>
</PubDate>
</Journal>
<VernacularTitle>The Impact of Literal Images in Traditional Medical Texts</VernacularTitle>
<FirstPage>41</FirstPage>
<LastPage>46</LastPage>
<Language>FA</Language>
<AuthorList>
<Author>
<FirstName>Manizheh</FirstName>
<LastName>Abdollahi</LastName>
<Affiliation>Department of Persian Literature & Language, Paramedical College, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Manijeh.abdolahi@gmail.com</Affiliation>
</Author>
</AuthorList>
<History>
<PubDate>
<Year>2012</Year>
<Month>04</Month>
<Day>15</Day>
</PubDate>
</History>
<Abstract>This is obvious that man’s advancement in tropical experimental sciences is indebted to the pure imagination of the authors and researchers. The present study aims to reveal that medicine as one of the most experimental sciences is undeniably associated with literal images and imaginative implications at least in traditional medicine. This occurs due to the fact that in the ancient times, physicians, philosophers and poets were not clearly distinguished and in many cases all the three were applied in one individual. Thus, it is entirely probable that those three fields are integrated consciously or otherwise. There is an attempt in this study to compare common literal images related to some known animals usually used in authentic traditional medicine texts and show the relationship between therapeutic properties of these animals and common literal images.</Abstract>
</Article>
</ArticleSet>


eISSN: 2251-886X        RHM NLM ID: 101589380

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